Equestrian

Equestrian

In early 1900, fine horsemen competed in high jump, long jump, and individual dressage events in the very first Equestrian Olympics Competition. As in all Olympics sports, riding has its great champions – riders who have mastered the correct combination of flexibility, dexterity, and control. Of course, the winning rider must exhibit a fine balance of gentleness and firmness in handling his mount. The superb form which the Olympics equestrian must achieve is not easily lost, and some talented champions have returned to the Olympics for repeat performances of exceptionally high acclaim. The present program of competition includes the three day event, the Grand Prix Jump and the Grand Prix Dressage Competition. The three day event begins with a dressage competition followed by an endurance test and ends with show jumping competition. In the Grand Prix Dressage Competition, the rider and horse must execute, from memory, a series of precise movements in a pre-established order. However, the real highlight of Equestrian Olympic Games is the very last event held on the central Olympics Stadium on the closing day… the Nation’s Cup or Grand Prix Jumping competition. This thrilling event pits the skillful riders and their mounts against a challenging course of twelve to fifteen obstacles. The Olympics Equestrian competition… as depicted on this First Day Cover… is such a dignified and regal sporting event, that it has aptly been nick-named, the Sport of Kings.