Hurdling

Hurdling

Securely set in their starting blocks, several muscular athletes tensely wait for the loud blast of the starting gun… a sound that will send them speeding down the track… hurdling over several obstacles along the way. As the gun sounds… and the race is on… the athletes sprint for the first several steps, and then… as depicted on this First Day Cover… leap, thrusting their leading leg upward and forward in order to clear the first hurdle. As they reach the ground, they quickly regain their stride and sprint in a maddening dash to the next hurdle… and to the next… and so on. The speedy sport of hurdling¬†consists of two separate variations: the short distance high hurdles, and the longer distance low hurdles. The most common high hurdles race is run at the distance of 110 meters at outdoor meets, or sixty meters at indoor meets. The high hurdlers must be able to leap over hurdles that are three feet, six inches high as they dash down the track. In contrast, the typical low hurdle race is run at the much longer distance of four hundred meters, with hurdles measuring about three feet high. Hurdling is a thrilling event that has been part of Olympics sports for many years. To honor this demanding event, the United States Postal Service issued the twenty eight cent air mail stamp that is affixed to this First Day Cover.